We are shocked by the number of women who still believe that you only need to wear sunscreen in summer and when the sun is actually shining bright outside. so, in the interest of everyone, here is a PSA. UV rays will harm your skin! hey not only cause pesky skin woes such as tan, premature ageing and rash, but also lead to serious skin issues like sunburn, skin diseases and skin cancer.

If you too belong to the club that underestimates the power of harmful UV rays and still don’t wear sunscreen on a cloudy or rainy day, girl, we need to have a chat. Here are three reasons why you need to shield your skin with the right amount of SPF even on a cloudy day.

Clouds don’t block the UV rays entirely
 

Clouds don’t block the UV rays entirely

You would think that clouds are doing the job of protecting your skin from sun damage, but you couldn’t be more wrong. A report by Skin Cancer Foundation says that around 80% of UV rays can pass through clouds and harm your skin. Although dense clouds would reduce the radiation to some extent, the rays can peep through them. Also, cloudy skies can clear up at any time. So, it is always best to wear a broad spectrum SPF to make sure free radical damage isn’t one of your skin problems.

The UVB rays can reflect through water and sand
 

The UVB rays can reflect through water and sand

A surprising fact we learnt in school about sun rays is that they can reflect through raindrops. No we aren’t talking about rainbows here. Research states that 17% of UVB rays can reflect through snow, water, grass and sand, which in turn intensifies the exposure by 80%. So even if it is pouring outside, chances are you are getting affected by the harmful rays. Reapply sunscreen every two to three hours to defend your skin against sun damage.

Sun damage has nothing to do with temperature
 

Sun damage has nothing to do with temperature

The common myth is that you only need sun protection in summer when it’s hot outside. And since the temperatures drop in cloudy, rainy and cold weather, you can skip sunscreen. Let’s put this myth to bed. The UV levels are the same on a cold and windy day as they are on a warm, sunny day. The UV index rating can be extreme on an overcast day too and can do just the same damage to your skin even when the temperature is low.

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