If you’ve ever pricked your thumb on a needle, you’ll recall the sensation as mildly uncomfortable with a slight amount of pain. Now would you intentionally repeat that feeling all over your face for the sake of healthy skin? If you’re cringing at the thought, brace yourself because the whole beauty industry is doing it. Yes, the skin care procedure goes by a the name of microneedling or skin needling and employs a dermaroller with multiple needles to get the job done. Here’s a little more about it.
What is microneedling?
 

What is microneedling?

In simple terms, microneedling is a skin care procedure in which a handheld device, whose head is covered with multiple tiny needles is rolled across the face with light pressure. The size of the needle head used is based on the texture and thickness of the patient’s skin. Microneedling is best carried out by a dermatologist.

What is the process of microneedling?
 

What is the process of microneedling?

First, an anaesthetic cream is applied on the skin, depending on the patient’s sensitivity. Next, water or a skin product is applied to lubricate the face and allow the roller to glide smoothly. The needle depth of the device, which is a dermaroller or microneedler, is adjusted. It is then rolled gently across the face in various directions. A single session lasts around 30 – 40 minutes and it is normal to find the skin raw and red post microneedling. Fortunately it isn’t a painful procedure, only slightly unpleasant with a twinge now and again.

How does microneedling work?
 

How does microneedling work?

This procedure is prescribed for issues like acne scarring, deep wrinkles or stretch marks which seem like they have no solution. When the device is worked across the face, the micro needles pierce tiny holes in the skin. While you may worry that this worsens the condition, it actually doesn’t. It creates a miniscule controlled injury which in turn, induces collagen production from within the skin. Collagen repairs the minute skin damage and encourages the healthy growth of future skin cells.